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Country codes of the world. XL.

For quite some time people have asked me about creating a larger version of our Country Codes of the World map, something they could pin up in their conference rooms or on office walls.

And a map without the legend, so that people could figure out on their own which ccTLDs stood for which country or region.

Now I’m pleased to offer just that — a whopping 4 foot by 3 foot black and white poster printed on lightweight paper.

Shown below is an excerpt of this map featuring our resident model Harlan. He’s a big cat and, despite his best efforts, even he can’t cover up all of the Americas.

To learn more and purchase, click here.

Feline not included.

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Welcome to the Kingdom of eSwatini, formerly known as Swaziland

When I read about Swaziland’s recent name change, by decree, my first thought was: What about the country code?

As in .sz?

As far as I can tell, it’s way too soon to know if the president has thought this far ahead. My guess is that things will stay the same for quite some time.

But country codes do change and will continue to change. And as I noted earlier, internationalized domain names also continue to evolve, as you can see here.

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A unique look at the emerging multilingual Internet

I’m happy to announce that I’ve updated my map of the world’s internationalized domain names for 2018:

The map includes all ICANN-approved country code IDNs for the world — more than 50 across more than 30 countries and regions.

I’ve also included a sidebar that details the many scripts and languages now supported within India. You can learn more and purchase here.

If you have any questions, please let me know.

I also design customized versions of this map as well as the Country Codes of the World map. These designs cover entire walls in offices in the US and Europe. I’m also beginning work on site-specific installations using mixed media. If you have any questions, please contact me.

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The Internet connects devices; Language connects people

There are more than three billion people on the internet today, yet fewer than 25% speak English natively. Roughly a billion of these non-English speakers connect to the Internet via mobile device. Hence this new poster from Byte Level Research.

To learn more and order, click here.

A copy of this print is bundled in with all purchases of the 2017 Web Globalization Report Card.