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The Year of the Pig (one localized website at a time)

Lunar New Year has arrived and, with it, the Chinese New Year (and related Asian New Year celebrations).

As I’ve done a few times in the past, I thought I’d feature a few localized web pages from multinationals as they make the most of Chinese New Year.

And, as in years past, we can expect to see plenty of the color red — the color of celebration and good fortune.

Beginning with Google:

And BMW practically wall-papered its China home page in red:

Buick (which has a very positive brand in China):

Nike:

Starbucks:

Coach:

Gucci:

Hermes (and its poorly punned promotion):

Speaking of luxury brands, they have invested heavily in China, but as you’ll see in the next Web Globalization Report Card, luxury brands are laggards in web globalization best practices.

<begin PSA> And speaking of pigs, did you know that they are more intelligent than most dogs? Sadly, we slaughter millions of these very smart and compassionate creatures every day. In honor of this amazing animal, I ask everyone who eats meat (as I once did) to consider cutting back or giving it up altogether. As someone who was raised on barbecue, I never would have imagined I would be one day write these words, which is proof that you will not wither away if you give up meat. You’ll actually be quite a bit healthier. And think of the animals you will save! </end PSA>

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Buick: A Chinese success story

I still look at the Buick brand as something for the post-60 demographic (though I must confess that demographic doesn’t feel quite so old anymore).

It’s an image Buick has been working to change for years.

But the beauty of globalization is that Buick doesn’t carry this sort of generational baggage in other countries.

Like China.

buick China website

The Chinese apparently love Buicks.

So much so that Buick sold 809,000 cars in China in 2013, compared with 205,000 in the US.

Crazy.

Here are some insights into why Buick has succeeded in China. An excerpt:

The common view of Buicks in China is different from that in the U.S. The cars are the choice of business people and government officials. Chinese executives are partial to minivans, which don’t come with the kid-hauling image they have here.

General Motors, which owns the brand, has capitalized on that popularity.

When it saw Chinese executives were partial to minivans, it designed the GL8 Luxury MPV just for the market, making it especially spacious and comfortable.

Buick is now releasing models in China ahead of the US.

Finally, let’s look at the Buick global gateway:

buick_global_gateway

This global gateway accurately reflects Buick’s leading markets in terms of sales.

And here is where Buick could be a bit short-sighted — it offers no localized websites for countries where I believe it intends to expand in the years ahead.

Perhaps all Buick needs is China. But what about Japan, South Korea, Taiwan?

Buick is clearly not our parent’s car brand any longer.

It’s a uniquely Chinese car brand.