The Dutch love .nl

Netherlands ccTLD

Country codes (ccTLDs) provide local and regional “front doors” to websites.

They also can be used as local brand extensions, as shown here with Amazon:

Amazon France logo

Not surprisingly, country code registries are proponents of ccTLDs. But I thought this visual was worth mentioning, this from the registry of .nl (Netherlands):

Netherlands country code

SIDN, the .nl registry, surveyed Dutch Internet users and found that “Between 75 and 80 per cent of private individuals and businesses would consider .nl if they were to register a domain name in the immediate future.”

Also interesting is this chart:

Dutch Internet input

Search engines are the primary way people reach websites on smartphones — which is an implicit recommendation for using country codes. After all, search engines use country codes as important indicators for local websites.

Here’s the link to the full report.

A global look at Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends report

Mary Meeker, a Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers partner, recently provided another healthy dose of data and trends, along with a number of predictions.

But the media largely overlooked the web and software globalization implications of many of these slides.

So allow me to chime in on the slides that jumped out at me.

Let’s begin with this slide:

Mary Meeker intl usage

So the “Made in USA” websites are leading the world in overall visitors. But what doesn’t get noted is that the top-7 websites average 91 languages.

That’s right, 91 languages —  an average skewed heavily by Wikipedia.

Here are my language counts:

Website Languages
Wikipedia 285
Google 145
Facebook 75
Microsoft 48
Yahoo! 47
Apple 32
Amazon 10

These “Made in the USA” websites have been “Localized for the world.” And that’s a major reason they’re so successful outside the USA.

Next slide:

Mary Meeker sharing global trend

Americans aren’t global leaders in “sharing” — though we’ve been unintentionally sharing quite a lot of our data with the NSA (a rant for a future day).

Now, I’m not sure  how different cultures define sharing, which has to be a major caveat to this slide.

Nevertheless, the fact that different cultures share different types and quantities of information is a major globalization challenge.

This isn’t just a Facebook or Google+ issue, it should factor into the degree to which you wish to integrate social networks into your website (as well as your expectations regarding engagement). Privacy concerns could very well be one of the most significant issues of the next decade and beyond.

Next slide:

China mobile trend

This slide is pretty easy to grasp. But a question that often comes up when looking at mobile trends around the world is “How many of X country’s mobile users are using smartphones?”

See below for the answer:

Mary Meeker global smartphone growth

I love this slide because it helps clarify exactly how many mobile users may actually be able to browser your mobile website (or download your mobile app).

China is a significant smartphone market while Russia is not (yet).

So when thinking global about your mobile strategy, you need to also think about smartphones vs. feature phones (those that offer poor or nonexistent web browsing).

So those were the slides that jumped out me. Let me know if something jumped out at you.

Free Webinar: The Leading Global Retailers (and why)

The Leading Global Retailers and Why

I hope you’ll join me on Wednesday for a free one-hour webinar (sponsored by Lionbridge).

I will talk about my research on the retail industry, focusing on companies like Amazon, Apple, and Best Buy. You’ll get a better understanding of just why retail is so challenging from a global perspective and how to minimize risks.

April 4, 2013
12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time | 17:00 Greenwich Mean Time

UPDATE: The call is now available for replay here.