Web Globalization Leaders in Life Sciences

webglobalization_lifesciences

As life sciences companies broaden their global sights to include new and emerging markets, their global (and mobile) websites have not always kept pace.

SDL recently commissioned a report in which I benchmarked a select group of 25 life sciences websites:

  • Abbott
  • Abbvie
  • Amgen
  • Astra Zeneca
  • Baxter
  • Bayer
  • Beckman
  • Coulter
  • Becton Dickinson
  • Boston Scientific
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Edwards Life Sciences
  • Eli Lilly resenius
  • Gilead Sciences
  • Hill-Rom
  • Johnson & Johnson/Janssen
  • Medtronic
  • Merck
  • Perkin Elmer
  • Pfizer
  • Sanofi
  • Sciex
  • Smith & Nephew
  • St. Jude Medical
  • Stryker

From languages to localized content to usability, this report highlights those companies that have done the very best at taking their websites global. In addition, this report provides valuable best practices from which companies across all industries can benefit.

You can request a free copy of the report here.

And I will be presenting from the report on May 25th via webinar, also free. You can register here.

I hope you can join!

 

 

 

Join me in Santa Clara next month for a web globalization event

I’m pleased to be presenting next month in Santa Clara, California on website globalization best practices.

I’ll be drawing heavily on the most recent Report Card. And I’ll also be joined by a panel of web globalization experts.

Here are the details:

March 22, 2016
11:30 am
Santa Clara, CA
Bourbon Steak & Pub at Levi’s Stadium

The presentation is sponsored by SDL and it is free. So if you’re around I hope you can join us.

Click here to register.

In search of a better translation icon

A few years ago I wrote about the translation icon and its many variations at that point in time.

I thought now would be a good time to revisit this icon.

Let’s start with the Google Translate. This icon has not changed in substance over the years but it has been streamlined a great deal.

Here is the icon used for its app:

google-translate-icon

Microsoft uses a similar icon across its website, apps, and APIs:

microsoft_translate

I’m not a fan of this icon, despite how prevalent it has become.

Before I go into why exactly, here is another app icon I came across:

another-translate-icon

These first three icons display specific language pairs, which could be interpreted as showing preference for a given language pair. This is the issue that I find problematic.

Why can’t a translate icon be language agnostic?

Here is how SDL approaches the translation icon:

sdl_translation

Although the icon is busy, I’m partial to what SDL is doing here — as this icon does not display a given script pair.

Here is another icon, from the iTranslate app:

iTranslate_app

The counter-argument to a globe icon is this: It is used EVERYWHERE. And this is true. Facebook, for example, uses the globe icon for notifications, which I’ve never understood. Nevertheless, the globe icon can successfully deliver different messages depending on context. In the context of a mobile app icon, I think a globe icon works perfectly well.

 

So the larger question here is whether or not a language pair is required to communicate “translation.” 

Google and Microsoft certainly believe that a language pair is required, which is where we stand right now. I’d love to see this change. I think we can do better.