Boeing and the trouble with flags in global gateways

Examine the Boeing global gateway below and see if you can see a problem:

boeing_flags

I did not realize the Middle East had an official flag but, according to this gateway, it does.

And herein lies a major problem with using flags — they’re not well suited to regional websites.

Apple has a similar problem as illustrated by its Latin American flags:

apple_flags_16

So what’s the solution?

Stop using flags for global navigation.

It’s quite simple actually.

And, yes, I do believe that Apple will drop flags from its website. Eventually.

For more on this, check out The Art of the Global Gateway.

Nike improves its global gateway

Nike made an important improvement to its global gateway over the past year that I want to draw your attention to.

First, let’s take a look at the home page, circa 2015:

nike_com_2015

If you look closely at the bottom of the web page, to the left, you’ll see the American flag — the link to the global gateway menu.

Clearly, this is not the most visible location for a global gateway. Footers are for legalese and other garbage — not for your most important global navigation interface.

Fortunately, Nike has since promoted the gateway link to the header, as shown here today:

nike_2016

As the flag itself, I recommend using a globe icon instead, alongside the locale name.

But progress is progress and the promotion of the global gateway into the header is one reason why Nike made it into the top 25 best global websites.

For more information, check out the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card.

Intel: The best global enterprise technology website of 2016

For the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card, we studied 11 enterprise technology websites:

  • Autodesk
  • Cisco Systems
  • EMC
  • IBM
  • Huawei
  • Intel
  • Oracle
  • SAP
  • Texas Instruments
  • Xerox
  • VMware

With support for 23 languages, Intel is not the language leader in this category; Cisco Systems leads with 40 languages.

But Intel leads in other ways.

Such as global navigation. First and foremost, Intel has embraced country codes, such as:

  • www.intel.de
  • www.intel.co.jp
  • www.intel.cn

On the China home page, the global gateway is perfectly positioned in the header. Also, note the globe icon — which makes this global gateway easy to find no matter what language you speak:

intel_cn

Selecting the globe icon brings up this “universal” global gateway menu:

intel_gateway_2015

Universal means this menu can be used across all localized websites — because the locale names are presented in the local languages and scripts (for the markets in which they are supported). 

Unfortunately, on the mobile website the globe icon is demoted to the footer. Shown here is the Polish home page:

Intel Poland mobile

Intel supports strong global consistency across its many local websites. Depth of local content varies and there are gaps in support content across a number of languages.

But Intel is making smart use of machine translation  to allows users to self-translate content into their target language. Shown here an excerpt from the Brazil website.

Intel Brazil Machine Translation

The button near the top of the page is what users select to self-translate content. Too few companies are making use of machine translation currently.

One concern, looking ahead, is that the .com design has very recently demoted the global gateway icon to the footer.

Intel global gateway in the footer

Ironically, it is the .com website that most requires a global gateway in the header because more than half of all visitors to the .com website originate outside of the US.

For more information, check out the Web Globalization Report Card.