Think Outside the Country: Coming April 10th

 

I’m pleased to announce the new book Think Outside the Country: A Guide to Going Global and Succeeding in the Translation Economy, due out on April 10th.

Think Outside the Country is isn’t strictly about taking a website or mobile app global, though you’ll find plenty of real-world examples about how to do just that. Ultimately, this book is about taking yourself global. It’s about providing an understanding of the globalization process along with country and cultural insights so you know what questions to ask when you’re asked to, say, introduce a product into a new market or launch a global marketing campaign.

This book is intended for people who want to help their organizations expand into new markets as efficiently as possible without any embarrassing or costly mistakes. And this book is about showing respect for the people who live in these markets.

You won’t speak every language, understand every culture. And that’s okay. Nobody knows everything. But we can all know a little bit about a lot. More important, we can know what questions to ask. This book will help.

You can learn more here.

And it’s now available for preorder on Amazon.

PS: We will also offer quantity discounts if you’d like to order a batch for your teams.

 

Chinese drawing even with English on global websites

Over the past decade Simplified Chinese has grown to become one of the most popular languages on global websites, second only to English.

According to the Web Globalization Report Card, which has long monitored languages supported by the world’s leading brands, Chinese was seen on only about six out of ten websites in 2006.

Today, it is seen on virtually every global website.

chinese language growth

That’s not to say languages such as French, German and Spanish aren’t important as well. In fact, French is right on par with Chinese, followed by German, Japanese, and Spanish.

Here are the top 10 languages overall:

top 10 languages

I should also note that Russian has seen a significant rise in usage over the past decade. In 2006, Russian was seen on only 42% of all global websites and now it’s up to 87%.

But there are language gaps still remaining. Arabic, for example, is spoken by more than 240 million people but only half of all global websites support it (so far).

And Hindi, with more than 260 million speakers, sees a paltry 4% of global website support — many companies cling to the hope that English will be sufficient for India. Perhaps for today but not for long. Consider that companies such as Facebook, Google and Twitter have embraced Hindi, as well as other Indic languages, foreshadowing a time when other companies will be compelled to follow their lead.

To learn more, check out the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card.

To learn more, check out the 2016 Web Globalization Report Card.

Global Gateway Fail: Yandex

Yandex is Russia’s leading search engine and, following in Google’s footsteps, is eager to take over much of Russia’s Internet, which naturally includes the web browser.

Yandex is also in the process of expanding its reach beyond Russia.

But when I visited the web browser download web page I couldn’t help but notice a few problems with the global gateway.

Shown below is the only “English” option for me.  The use of the UK flag signals to me that Yandex doesn’t yet have a web browser available for American web users. But perhaps Yandex is using the flag to simply indicate language, but I can’t be sure either way. What I am sure of is that flags are usually a bad idea in global gateways.

yandex_gateway

Flags often limit the reach of a language, so use them only if you’re focused on specific ecommerce/legal scenarios. If, for example, your goal is to reach the maximum number of English speakers around the world don’t use the flag of one English-speaking country.

Clicking on the Select Language link brings up the following menu. Take a quick look and see if anything looks a bit odd to you…

yandex_gateway2

You might notice the use of Spain’s flag to indicate “Spanish.”  Granted, the localization could be specific to Spain only, but I’d bet that Yandex would prefer that most Spanish speakers download the app and not just Spaniards.

I also didn’t realize that Brazil’s dominant language was  known as Brazilian. Actually, it’s not. It’s supposed to be called Brazilian Portuguese. Another global gateway fail.

So I’d say at this point, based purely on the global gateway, that Yandex has a ways to go before world domination.